Top Books 2018

Top Books 2018

This year I decided to try something different with my reading, I did my best to track every book I read with goodreads. And while I don’t think I nailed it perfectly, there are some I would forget to include or others that I would forget to update after I finished reading, it seemed to be a pretty handy way to keep track of and review what I read this past year. I’m sure it’s way more powerful than that, but I’m becoming the old guy who doesn’t always understand how to properly use these new hip gadgets.

This year, I’ve read 43 books so far, which puts me at the top end of my goal to read 25-50 each year.

In case you are looking for some suggestions on books to buy for Christmas presents, I thought I’d offer what I thought were the best books that I read this year.

Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved by Kate Bowler

This was easily, hands down one of the best books I read this year. I met Kate at a writer’s bootcamp a few years ago when she was working through the concept of this book, which made it a joy not only to read but to see it sit on the New York Times bestseller list for several weeks. Kate has done her doctoral work in the history of the faith healing movement in America, and while she was doing her research, became incredibly ill, eventually fighting cancer as a young mom. She wrestles with faith, easy answers and is humorous, thoughtful and vulnerable as she does. If we are friends, I have probably already recommended this book to you this year.

Deep Work by Cal Newport

This is another one that I probably recommended to you already as well. Newport is a professor at Georgetown University and has taken to learning to make a science out of developing the skills to focus on significant work, what he calls deep work. He argues that most of us don’t actually engage in that sort of work anymore because of the amount of distraction that we allow in, and he offers larger thoughts about how to do that as well as practical suggestions

Becoming Dallas Willard by Gary Moon

It’s no secret to anyone who knows me that I have a proclivity towards wanting to learn from Dallas Willard. He was the kind of man that I would want to become and so I find myself more and more drawn to learn not only from his teachings but from his life. This was a great biography by one of Dallas’ disciples that was interesting and insightful. If you’ve been impacted by Willard and his teaching, it’s worth reading.

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser

One of the things that I did this year was to intentionally get books from the library that would be different from what I’d normally read. I used their online app and would only get library books available for download on the kindle, which has limited my selection, but it’s also brought books to my attention that I wouldn’t have noticed otherwise. This was a fascinating biography about Laura Ingalls Wilder, who wrote the Little House on the Prairie series. It was an honest look at the realities of the country, homesteading and the move west during that time, how she turned herself into a successful writer and what her family life was actually like. I found myself often telling other people stories from her life as I read it

Robin by Dave Itzkoff

I’ve long considered Robin Williams to be brilliant, but I honestly didn’t know much about him. This was another great biography that felt both honest and honoring.

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Isaac was reading this for school, so Allison and I decided to read it along with him. I had forgotten how good this book is and how much I enjoyed it. If you’ve never read this modern classic or if it’s been a while, it’s a good one to pick up.

Cross Vision by Greg Boyd

Boyd is fascinating in that he lives at the intersection of being a biblical scholar and a local church pastor. The way he processes faith and the Scriptures are always intriguing to me and I often want to learn from him however I can. He had recently finally published his magnum opus work, a two volume treatise on dealing with the violence of God in the Bible, called The Crucifixion of the Warrior God. Cross Vision is essentially the abridged version of that much larger, scholarly work. Greg works to make sense of the pictures of a violent God, with Jesus as his starting point of what God must always look like. He has produced an important work, taking seriously the nature of Jesus and the Scriptures. If you’ve ever struggled with making sense of the violence of God in the Scriptures, this would be a great book. It’s Greg being pastoral with his scholarly work, so it’s very readable and does not feel overly scholarly in its tone or content

High Fidelity by Nick Hornsby

I had never read any Hornsby books, and a friend had chastised me for that this year, telling me I needed to give High Fidelity a shot. I not only really enjoyed this one, but I ended up reading 2 more by Hornsby this year after it. I’m not quite sure how to describe Hornsby and his writing, as I don’t read a ton of fiction, but I found myself drawn in by the characters he creates and like I was being casually told a story by an Englishman in a bar.